The Twists and Turns at Trebević

This article first appeared at Remembering Yugoslavia under the title, “The Twists and Turns at Trebević: Renovation of the Sarajevo Olympic Bobsled Track.”

*

The bobsledders sported black-and-blue bodysuits and full helmets but the Union Jack plastered on the hull gave them away.

The driver, rugby player and British national bobsleigh champion, Tom De La Hunty, and his brakeman, Peter Lund, held onto push bars to rock the bullet-shaped boblet to and fro. “One, two, three—go!” they finally shouted, leaned into the final push, and ran the boblet down the track.

UK Team at Sarajevo 84 Bobsled Race

The two jumped into the fiberglass cowling, and, bending as aerodynamically as possible, tucked in for the run. Twenty years after Great Britain had pulled an upset and won the race in Innsbruck, De La Hunty and Lund stood no chance against the East Germans and Soviets here at the Sarajevo 1984 Winter Olympics—they were in 18th place after two heats, halfway through the race. Snow was falling heavy for a third straight day, turning the world’s fastest track into a treacherous one.

Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Luge-Track-Aerial
COURSE1
LENGTH350 M
NUMBER OF CURVES LEFT1
NUMBER OF CURVES RIGHT1
PURPOSERECREATION

This way to the abandoned bobsled track, point the maps and signs and arrows. Built for the 1984 Olympic Winter Games, used as a makeshift military installation during the Siege of Sarajevo, and left to decay in the decades hence, the skeleton of the bobsled and luge track at Mt. Trebević is now a tourist attraction for war trippers and ruin porn addicts.

But over the past few years a team of locals has been working to return the track to its original purpose. Architecture professor, Sanela Klarić, is one of the driving forces behind the effort. “Sarajevo’s identity has for decades been connected with war and suffering, people talk about the past too much here,” she tells me as we walk toward the track on an unseasonably hot May day, thirty-eight years after the Olympics. Just a few minutes out of her car, sweat trickles down my back. Dressed in bright-colored summer casuals and high heels, Klarić scales the platform that housed the push-off area for the bobsled competitions with boundless energy and a seemingly perpetual smile. The athletes’ push time could decide the outcome of the run.

Trebevic-Bobsled-Track-Start

We’re high above the smog inversion choking the city again this week. Everything projects with throbbing clarity and the forest smells sweet. Songbirds muffle the chatter of hikers on a path above (as a mountain within city limits, Trebević is a popular spot for nature-loving Sarajevans). I squint against the midday sunlight bouncing off the concrete.

Downhill off to the right, I can see the steep concrete ramp that plunged from the luge start house where lugers sitting atop their flat steel sleds would push off the ice floor with spiked gloves, lie supine feet first, and projectile through the track channel.

As we descend the track, Klarić walks me through its history—and possible future.

The bobsledders sported black-and-blue bodysuits and full helmets but the Union Jack plastered on the hull gave them away. The driver, rugby player and British national bobsleigh champion, Tom De La Hunty, and his brakeman, Peter Lund, held onto push bars to rock the bullet-shaped boblet to and fro. “One, two, three—go!” they finally shouted, leaned into the final push, and ran the boblet down the track. The two jumped into the fiberglass cowling, and, bending as aerodynamically as possible, tucked in for the run.

UK Team at Sarajevo 84 Bobsled Race

Twenty years after Great Britain had pulled an upset and won the race in Innsbruck, De La Hunty and Lund stood no chance against the East Germans and Soviets here at the Sarajevo 1984 Winter Olympics—they were in 18th place after two heats, halfway through the race. Snow was falling heavy for a third straight day, turning the world’s fastest track into a treacherous one.

Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Luge-Track-Aerial
COURSE1
LENGTH350 M
NUMBER OF CURVES LEFT1
NUMBER OF CURVES RIGHT1
PURPOSERECREATION

This way to the abandoned bobsled track, point the maps and signs and arrows. Built for the 1984 Olympic Winter Games, used as a makeshift military installation during the Siege of Sarajevo, and left to decay in the decades hence, the skeleton of the bobsled and luge track at Mt. Trebević is now a tourist attraction for war trippers and ruin porn addicts.

Map-of-Trebevic-with-Track-Directions

But over the past few years a team of locals has been working to return the track to its original purpose. Architecture professor, Sanela Klarić, is one of the driving forces behind the effort.

“Sarajevo’s identity has for decades been connected with war and suffering, people talk about the past too much here,” she tells me as we walk toward the track on an unseasonably hot May day, thirty-eight years after the Olympics. Just a few minutes out of her car, sweat trickles down my back. Dressed in bright-colored summer casuals and high heels, Klarić scales the platform that housed the push-off area for the bobsled competitions with boundless energy and a seemingly perpetual smile. The athletes’ push time could decide the outcome of the run.

Trebevic-Bobsled-Track-Start

We’re high above the smog inversion choking the city again this week. Everything projects with throbbing clarity and the forest smells sweet. Songbirds muffle the chatter of hikers on a path above (as a mountain within city limits, Trebević is a popular spot for nature-loving Sarajevans). I squint against the midday sunlight bouncing off the concrete.

Downhill off to the right, I can see the steep concrete ramp that plunged from the luge start house where lugers sitting atop their flat steel sleds would push off the ice floor with spiked gloves, lie supine feet first, and projectile through the track channel.

Sanela-Klaric

As we descend the track, Klarić walks me through its history—and possible future. And I think of my own country that, like Klarić’s, no longer exists. But even though Czechoslovakia got dismantled in peace, all I have is fading memories of growing up in a totalitarian country and the person I’m beginning to forget no longer exists either. Here vestiges like this ruin keep standing to recall Yugoslavia’s glory.

The drop past the push-off stretch feels precipitous as drifts of dried pine needles and cones crunch underfoot. Patches of moss stain the low walls which bank up where the track snakes into the first curve, or corner. Angled pylons that supported a safety covering, or a roof, overhang the track like gallows. At the second corner, or K2, the grade drops to fifteen percent.

Sarajevo-84-Bobsleigh-Track

Whereas the driver steered the bob with a pair of ring handles attached to steering pulleys that controlled the front runners, the luger steered their sled by shifting the weight of their shoulders and calves. In both sports, the sliders’ goal was to cut a line through the ice-covered track channel that would yield the fastest time. The challenge for riders down the run was to minimize drag, avoid hitting the walls and oversteering, and let the sleds do the work. De La Hunty and Lund only lagged two hundredths of a second behind the best time in the third heat when they entered the K1.

K1-at-Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Track

Graffiti on the banked walls colors the heat. The track has become an open-air gallery, sprayed and repainted over the years. Pines and hornbeams encroach on the structure, offering scant shade. Though I’ve never been here, never even visited Yugoslavia while it existed, I feel not only as though I’ve returned, it’s as if I were again recalling a decades-long memory.

Graffiti-at-Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Track

Throughout socialist Yugoslavia’s existence, Bosnia and Herzegovina was a poor, underdeveloped republic where, despite its mountainous beauty, winter sports had almost no tradition. By the 1970s, the heavily indebted country that had positioned itself between the two opposing blocs desperately needed foreign currency even as it was investing heavily in economically lagging regions like Bosnia. Tourism was among the main ways to inject foreign currency into the economy.

According to Jason Vuic, author of The Sarajevo Olympics: A History of the 1984 Winter Games (2015), Sarajevo bid for the Olympic Games, an effective marketing tool for any country, “simply as a way to create a winter tourist industry, to introduce Bosnia and its natural beauty to the rest of the world.”

The bid was a long shot. Whereas Slovenia, Yugoslavia’s most developed, alpine republic, had decades of experience hosting winter sporting events and extensive infrastructure in place, Bosnia and Herzegovina had next to none. And whereas the Slovenes thought of the Olympics as an expensive undertaking, Bosnians went for it.

“No one in Yugoslavia thought Bosnia had any hope or any business applying,” Vuic told me in an online interview; the Slovenes even intervened with the country’s ailing lifetime leader, Josip Broz Tito, to withdraw the bid. And, because it competed with Gothenburg and Sapporo, giants of winter competitions, “no one in their right mind thought Sarajevo had any chance. None.”

When Sarajevo won the bid anyway, expectations across Yugoslavia were so low, said Vuic, sceptics would say, “the Games are going to go on, but no one’s going to change the light bulbs.” A frantic cleanup and construction effort transformed the polluted provincial town into an arena for the world’s sporting spotlight.

The bobsled and luge track was among the facilities built from scratch for the Olympics. Continuing a tradition of recreation dating back to the Austro-Hungarian times, the organizers sited the 70-hectare complex at Mt. Trebević and contracted with a West German company to build it.

The balmy, dry winter leading up to the Games had the organizers concerned but the night before the opening ceremony a major storm hit and it snowed so much for the ensuing three days that events had to be postponed. Klarić, who was a highschool freshman then, says, “It was like we were blessed.”

Bobsled-Luge-Track-Trebevic-Mountain

A festive atmosphere blanketed the gritty city. “Everybody was excited about the Olympics,” Klarić says. Like many other locals, her family hosted teens from around Yugoslavia as part of a continuous countrywide student exchange. Every morning, the girls would collect flags of Yugoslavia at sporting venues and cheer on the athletes (Klarić still corresponds with her Olympics friends in Slovenia). “It was a period of time when I was a happy person. Yugoslavia for me and my family meant prosperity and freedom.”

The XIV Olympic Winter Games swirled with uplifting narratives: no country boycotted the event; record number of nations participated; and the Games took place without a hitch thanks to flawless organization.

At age eight I was too little to pay attention to the Olympics but, despite the considerable ideological differences between the two regimes, period news footage from Czechoslovak Television beamed with pride in a fellow socialist country’s accomplishment. Sarajevo ‘84 was non-aligned Yugoslavia’s biggest and most glorious sporting event.

It also united, if briefly, the country that many sensed was already disintegrating after Tito’s death four years prior. It was here that the Slovene Jure Franko won Yugoslavia’s first Winter Olympic medal, a silver in giant slalom. In anniversary throwback pieces the local news media still calls the Olympics, “a fairy tale.”

“That’s why the project is so important,” Klarić says about the renovation, “to restore the positive identity of life, happiness, and the Olympic spirit and to return the city onto the sporting world map. Sarajevo deserves it.”

Fifteen nations participated in the bobsled competitions at Sarajevo ‘84, seventeen in luge. Boblets, bobsleds, and luges went the entire length of the course, in forty-one to fifty-four seconds.

The track at Trebević could be divided into three autonomous courses with mechanical switching blocks. Klarić and I step onto an odd-looking, partly amputated section of the track. With wide sweeps of her arms she shows me how the block would move sideways to shift the course from the main track channel to a separate end section.

Sanela-Klaric-at-Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Track

On the outer wall of a track curve diverging up into the woods, orange insulation weathers away, blackened and mossy. Thanks to this first-in-the-world feature, the Trebević track continued to be used for competitions as well as training and recreation. Sarajevans would go down the recreational course in a boxy sled named after the Olympics mascot, Vučko (Wolfie). A PE teacher invited Klarić and her classmates to a sledding competition here at the first course. Klarić laughs about it. “I screamed the whole way down.”

Trebevic-Bobsleigh-Track-Wheels
COURSE2
LENGTH374 M
NUMBER OF CURVES LEFT3
NUMBER OF CURVES RIGHT2
TECHNICAL CORNERSDOUBLE-S
PURPOSETRAINING OR RECREATION

The track was the steepest and fastest of the seventeen in existence around the world. Though Sarajevans had been sledding down the city’s hills for centuries, bobsled and luge as sports remain practically unknown here. Yet during the Olympic competitions, thousands of spectators lined the track to watch athletes whiz by at high speeds.

UK Team at Sarajevo Olympics Bobsled Track

The third and fourth corners completed the acceleration portion of the track and marked the first split time. At 104 kilometers per hours, De La Hunty and Lund trailed the then-best split time by eight hundredths of a second.

The forest opens onto a paved clearing. The ruins of the media center stand overgrown up the hill and below the track several roads intersect.

Sarajevo-Bobsled-Track-Media-Building

Without the context of the trees, this fifth corner, K5, exposes the track’s full mass as it curls into the Double-S Combination, one of the multi-corner technical challenges required for international competitions. The high banks of the curves confined racers within the track against the centrifugal force pushing them up and outward.

Sarajevo-Trebevic-Bobsled-Track

Less than a decade after the Olympics, Sarajevo exploded into the world’s spotlight again. After Bosnia and Herzegovina declared independence from Yugoslavia, in 1992, Bosnian Serbs, bent on incorporating Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) majority areas into their own breakaway state, encircled Sarajevo with armed forces and over 44 months rained on it an estimated 120,000 mortar shells and countless sniper bullets.

By the time the longest siege in modern history ended, in February 1995, some 11,000 Sarajevans, including an estimated 1,600 children, were dead, and hundreds of buildings, including Olympic facilities, destroyed or heavily damaged. Zetra Hall, venue of the hockey and skating competitions as well as the closing ceremony, was turned into a morgue and its wooden seats were repurposed for coffins.

A high schooler then, I was mourning Czechoslovakia breaking up under my feet, but I also felt relief it wasn’t us disintegrating in violence. We all fall in our own way.

The siege line ran across the track complex on the slopes of Mt. Trebević. For Sarajevans, the mountain of happy memories came to loom over their besieged lives as one of danger and death.

Forced to flee from their apartment in a Sarajevo suburb, Klarić’s family spent the war in the city center, moving frequently between relatives and friends, shelters and cellars, as on some days over 300 artillery shells from Trebević landed in the city. She attended her architecture classes, made art from trash and war debris, and met and married the love of her life (the photograph of the couple walking hand-in-hand and smiling underneath a patched canvas sheltering the street from snipers’ scopes ranks among the most iconic images of the siege).

Klaric-by-Danilo-Krstanovic
Photo by Danilo Krstanović

To this day, memorials called Sarajevo Roses formed from red resin filling craters in the tarmac mark spots where people died from mortar attacks.

Sarajevo-Rose

Bullet holes still pockmark many apartment buildings around windows where snipers missed the residents inside. For nearly a quarter century, Klarić would refuse to even look at the mountain. After all that happened, she says, “I couldn’t understand how anyone could go up there anymore.”

Sarajevo-84-Luge-Track

A long straightaway uncoils the track back into the forest. I step over the ledge of another switching block to explore the separate curve that finished the second course. It is in this unused part of the track that I find the last murder holes, remaining from some fifty that Serbian soldiers had knocked through the concrete.

I trace ragged outlines with my fingers. The chipped concrete and the exposed steel wire mesh, bent into U shape for shooting support, feel warm to the touch. “The snipers could see the city like the palm of their hand,” Klarić says. When I peer through the openings, all I can see is forest.

Trebevic-Bobsled-Track-Hole
COURSE3
LENGTH576 M
NUMBER OF CURVES LEFT3
NUMBER OF CURVES RIGHT3
TECHNICAL CORNERSOMEGA (AKA HAIRPIN), LABYRINTH
PURPOSERECREATION OR TRAINING

Klarić completed her doctoral studies and entered the architecture field in the early aughts. When some years later an out-of-town colleague invited her for a hike to Mt. Trebević, she finally returned to the mountain. “That’s when I realized how much I love Trebević,” she says. “I saw the bobsled track and said, ‘No, nobody will take that mountain from me.’”

K8-at-Trebevic-Bobsled-Track

The course takes a 200-degree turn at K8. Gravitational force exceeding 4Gs pasted De La Hunty and Lund against the sharp curve’s belly. They entered so-called Omega corner, owing to its shape, with a lag of thirty-two hundredths of a second.

The make-or-break corner corked them out into the Labyrinth, a series of deceptively gentle curves. Most crashes occurred in this right-left-right, the trickiest and fastest part of the course. De La Hunty and Lund flipped over their boblet here—only to emerge in the next curve back on all four runners.

UK Team at Sarajevo 84 Bobsled Track

After the war, the track complex was looted and stripped of all valuable parts and materials: cables and wires, machinery and pipes, roofing and electronic equipment—all gone. Only the concrete remained, an essence that, like the city’s spirit, would be chipped and wounded but not destroyed.

Around the time Klarić returned to the mountain, BuzzFeed included the track on the list of “most beautiful abandoned places in the world.” Despite the gloom of abandonment and annihilation, there is indeed something graceful and grand about the place.

Sarajevo-Bobsleigh-Track

The concrete has been patched up over the years as sports returned to the track. The 2007 and 2008 Red Bull Hot Run, an inline skating competition, marked the first time since Yugoslavia’s breakup the track was used for a sporting event. Beginning in 2014, luge teams from various European countries have been unofficially summer training at the Trebević track, which has also become popular with mountain bikers.

Senad Omanović and his team of lugers have been maintaining the track since. Omanović is the president of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s national luge association, a coach, and a key member of the renovation task force. As a young luger, he fell short of qualifying for the Sarajevo Olympics, which he admits to lacking proper words to describe. But he spends little time on the past. It is what needs to happen next that interests him most.

Bosnian-Luge-Team-Demo

“The renovation of the track is my wish and my dream,” Omanović says when I meet him a few days later at a café in the Hrasno neighborhood, a conglomeration of Yugoslav-era apartment blocks outside the city center. Sporting a musketeer beard and compression socks, he speaks with an air of well-practiced yet good-hearted determination. “People laugh at me, they tell me I’m crazy, that it’s impossible.”

The project has its detractors. Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country of 3.2 million people, has been experiencing mass emigration for some time. Each year tens of thousands of people leave—some 13 percent of the country’s population between 2011 and 2019 according to estimates—out of disillusionment with clientelism and corruption. Ethnonationalism is straining the country in its federal seams. The war in Ukraine induced widespread PTSD here, and rising food and energy prices strain budgets at all government levels. Spending treasure on sports and recreation amidst existential problems seems frivolous to many, the dream too big.

Yet Klarić insists money could be made available if it weren’t being wasted.

Omanović has spent his own time and dime over the last two decades on the project, talking to anyone who would listen, presenting his case in the media, and patching the rifle holes with mortar. His principal argument: when you add up fees for training, competitions, and recreational use, the track would not only pay for itself but be profitable.

While Omanović’s apartment doubles as the luge association’s office, the equipment headquarters is in a single storage room located in the basement of a nearby highrise. Several luges stand leaning against the wall. Parts and bags fill storage shelves and a work table under bright fluorescent lights.

One of Omanović’s charges, Mirza Nikolajev, could be mistaken for a basketball player but he was among the top 10 junior lugers in the world. He jokes that cleaning the Trebević track for summer training is his conditioning (for winter training, the team travels to Austria and Germany) and lies down on a wheel-mounted luge to demonstrate steering for me.

Earlier in 2022, Nikolajev became Bosnia and Herzegovina’s first luger since 1998 to participate in the Olympics. Though he placed last at Beijing, in true Olympic spirit he counts qualifying as his greatest sporting success.

Bosnian-Luge-Team

Omanović credits Klarić with bringing the track renovation project to the official fore. Whereas just a few years ago he doubted a full reconstruction was possible, thanks to Klarić’s efforts, he says, “I am now one hundred percent certain the track will be renovated. The will to succeed is all in your head.”

In 2018, months after the newly reopened Sarajevo cable car led to a sharp increase in visits to the mountain, Klarić got elected to the parliament of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, one of the country’s two constituent, state-level entities. On the platform of renovating the remaining abandoned Olympic facilities, Klarić organized architects, sportspeople, urban planners, and government officials to push the bureaucratic machinery down the project line.

“Everything is going slowly,” she says. “But what’s important is that there is progress and that we got together as a team.”

The project reached top speed when officials from Barcelona, host of the 1992 Summer Olympics, Sarajevo’s sister city, and financier of Zetra Hall’s renovation, proposed a joint bid for the 2030 Winter Olympics. Bobsled, luge, and ski jumping competitions would be held in Sarajevo, at facilities that would need to be fully renovated.

The bid soon garnered support from Olympic committees around the region. The Sarajevo Canton, a county-level unit administering the region, placed the project among its highest priorities; the city allocated money for a feasibility study.

Yet on paper, the track does not exist. Like all other Olympic facilities, the bobsled and luge track officially is under the care of the organizing committee’s successor organization but because the nonprofit never registered the track in the cadaster, the structure is officially classified as a forest, with portions of it located in a newly-designated natural protected area.

Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Track-Finish-Board

Tall pines and the supports of the bygone electronic scoreboard tower over the finish corner. K13 whips around into the finishing area. Below the track, the hulk of a former refrigeration and control station bares its innards to the sun, the ammonium container lids like tombstones.

Sarajevo-Bobsled-Track-Auxiliary-Station

At the finish line, each sled faced the TV cameras crowding an overpass. Only here was the brakeman permitted to use his main tool.

Sarajevo-Bobsled-Track-Finish

The winner of the race was the individual or team with the shortest combined time for four heats. The experienced boblet and bobsled drivers from East Germany bested the novel Soviet technology, which made their red bob, whose nickname owing to its resemblance to a hammerhead was the Shark Sled, the fastest vehicle in the competition. The two countries topped the team competitions at the track; men lugers from the two countries placed high in both the singles and doubles races, and women lugers from the DDR took all three medals (Yugoslav and Czechoslovak athletes ranked in bottom halves).

It hits me: like Klarić’s Yugoslavia and my Czechoslovakia, those countries don’t exist anymore either. Our homes are gone from the map but just as the track is still here, Sarajevans like Klarić are still here—and I’m still here too.

The track slants upward into a counter-slope. Time for the sleds to come to a halt and the riders to dismount. Because they completed the race intact, De La Hunty and Lund’s ride counted (they took 21st place in the 27-strong lineup, just ahead of Yugoslavia’s best tandem, Zdravko Stojnić and Siniša Tubić). De La Hunty, who looked hurt after the flipover, his helmeted head bobbing uncontrollably, was fine. Before he got out of the bob, he showed the cameras a sign he had taped inside the cowling:

WHAT DO YOU
THINK OF IT SO FAR

UK Team at Sarajevo 84 Bobsled

The shallow trough trails into the distance where the track fades into the thicket.

A few weeks after my walkabout with Klarić, Spain’s Olympic Committee will withdraw the 2030 bid due to political differences among lower-level governments that resemble conflicts in Yugoslavia before the Sarajevo Games. They briefly float a bid for the subsequent Games before the idea vanishes altogether.

After the October elections in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the City of Sarajevo will quietly re-allocate funds to other uses and Klarić will shift to the Canton assembly where she will theoretically be closer to the project. Absent Barcelona’s support, the renovation project will go on ice. Still, from all sides I will continue to hear, the track will be renovated—we just don’t know when.

In the meantime, luge dry trainings and summer camps will keep bringing life back to the track while the structure itself remains unchanged.

“It’s a grand and beautiful monument in nature,” Klarić says. What it commemorates makes a list as long and twisted as itself. Memory of triumph and death and hope echoes through the woods—and it all counts because, bruises and wrinkles aside, we too are intact.

Sanela-Klaric-at-Trebevic-Bobsled-Track

I push through the thin tree branches and touch the ledge at the track’s end. Then I turn around, take a breath, and hike back up to the start.

ABOVE SEA LEVEL – START1,108.5 M
ABOVE SEA LEVEL – FINISH982.6 M
LENGTH1,300.0 M
NUMBER OF CURVES LEFT6
NUMBER OF CURVES RIGHT7
DIFFERENCE OF ELEVATION125.9 M
MAXIMUM GRADIENT15.0%
AVERAGE GRADIENT10.2%
MINIMUM GRADIENT1%
Sarajevo-Olympic-Bobsled-Track-Schematic

Additional Sources

  • Judd, Ron. “Bobsled, Luge, Skeleton | Winter Olympics Spectator’s Guide.” An excerpt from The Winter Olympics: An Insider’s Guide to the Legends, the Lore, and the Games. Seattle Times, December 12, 2009
  • Komarova, Mariya. “World Bobsleigh Tracks: From Geometry to the Architecture of Sports Facilities. Nexus Network Journal Vol. 20 (2018): 235-49
  • Koružnjak, Boris et al. Olympic track at Sarajevo comeback. An unpublished research paper, 2018
  • Pedrotty, Kate Meehan. “Yugoslav Unity and Olympic Ideology at the 1984 Sarajevo Winter Olympic Games.” In: Hannes Grandits and Karin Taylor, eds. Yugoslavia’s Sunny Side: A History of Tourism in Socialism (1950s–1980s). Budapest: Central European University Press, 2010
  • Petrov, Ana. “How Doing Sport Became a Culture: Producing the Concept of Physical Cultivation of the Yugoslavs.” International Journal of the History of Sport, Vol. 34 No. 9 (2017)
  • Vuic, Jason. The Sarajevo Olympics: A History of the 1984 Winter Games. Boston: University of Massachusetts Press, 2015

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shopping Cart